4 ways to cultivate creativity

Creativity involves more than encouraging employees to become thought leaders. Cultivating creativity is a process and should be a priority inside and out of the office.

These skills enhance problem-solving, team collaboration, innovation, communication and growth. Creativity is not reserved for writers or artists, it’s beneficial to all employees as it can help them grow and push personal and professional boundaries. So how can cultivating creativity become a goal-oriented task on every company’s to-do list?

In order to foster creativity, consider these tips: collaboration, do your homework, and embrace change and bravery.

1. Collaboration

First things first: every employee must be willing to work with others to expand upon and develop ideas that will bring in revenue, stronger relationships with clients and long-term success. More intuitive minds working together will increase the likelihood of creative and successful results, and provide more diverse perspectives, ideas and resources.

Diversity is an important aspect to consider regarding collaboration and creativity. It is all too easy to get stuck in a rut with the same old ideas and reworking past innovations. Bringing in different backgrounds allows ideas to flow more collaboratively and the ideas that result will appeal to wider audiences.

Appealing to larger audiences gives your new, creative idea the chance to evolve and adapt to audiences over time. As social and political issues change and continue to impact the professional world, innovations that consider a wide range of audiences will have longer lifetimes. Innovations that only appeal to a certain demographic group at a certain time might get the job done at the moment, but it won’t last, and you’ll be right back at the drawing board once the idea is no longer relevant for that target audience.

Teamwork makes innovation easier and more successful in the long run. Have genuine conversations with your team. Even when the discussion diverts and goes off onto a tangent, good conversations can help creative thinking flow.

Don’t be too proud to lean on coworkers when whipping up new ideas. It saves time, resulting in more efficient usage of the workday and more profitable ideas.

2. Do your homework

The job doesn’t begin when it begins. It begins days, weeks or even months prior to actually sitting down at your desk and crafting up a project plan or campaign.

To improve your creative skills, get used to doing your homework and staying curious. It’s important to research industry news and developments, products, services and anything else that could inform your new, creative ideas.If you ever have questions about an idea you’re working on, do the research required to be more informed on the topic you’re developing.

When crafting these new ideas, be sure to write down every thought you have. Having a notebook to work out of is a great way to keep your ideas, questions and research data organized. It’s also important to write down even crazy thoughts you have while daydreaming. There are no dumb questions, and, sometimes, those questions further your creative spirit and inform your future endeavors.

If your creativity brings you to the point of delivering a presentation to your peers or executive team, you must have the research, data and statistics to support your plans. You will be asked hard questions, especially if your ideas are unconventional or extensively creative, so you want to be prepared for any questions that come your way.

Part of growing as a creative is continuing your education. Learn everything there is to know about the happenings of your industry and competitors. This research is the backbone of every new idea you present to your team.

3. Embrace change

With creativity comes change. You will have to step out of your comfort zone and feel slightly uncomfortable in order to grow and improve.

An idea that sounds amazing and doable today, may not sound the same tomorrow. Ideas and plans are always changing in the professional world, so you have to be able to adapt quickly and effortlessly.

The idea you pitch at first will continue to evolve and transform in major ways before the idea is actually acted upon and implemented.

In order to survive a competitive market, once great ideas evolve into entirely new ways or working or living. For example, Netflix began as a DVD rental company and is now the most popular streaming service for movies and television shows. The original product was once a great idea, but it needed to adapt to the changing landscape of how people consume television and film. If it didn’t, it could have failed like Blockbuster.

It’s okay to feel uncertain about your changing ideas, but embrace and accept the twists and turns of the idea journey. Do not feel discouraged when your idea undergoes a total transformation. You got the ball rolling and ended up with a great new product!

Creativity is how change manifests; it’s a process and takes time.

4. Be brave

It takes a special kind of person to realize the importance of bravery when it comes to creativity. It’s a lot of trial and error and could include many late nights full of impending failure. It sounds scary, but it comes with the job.

Developing ideas and changing them constantly never truly results in failure. Even when your attempts fail, with the right mindset, your team learns valuable lessons that will help with future success.

A million failed ideas are not real failures, they’re just a million ideas that helped you get to the final idea that did work.

Learning to be creative is not a simple task. It takes practice, time, effort and problem solving. These four skills, however, will enhance your journey to becoming a creative powerhouse. Never quit thinking, playing and creating.

SMU alumna Rosie Roberson’s career is skyrocketing in an unexpected way

Rosie Roberson has always been herself.

She hasn’t changed who she is when she embarks on a new journey. She’s always been goofy, creative and out there. Throughout her transitions from Austin back to Dallas and from music to fashion and journalism, she learned how to be a little more refined “while not being cookie cutter.”

Roberson was born and raised in the Preston Hollow area of Dallas. Throughout high school, she expected to attend The University of Texas (UT) to pursue her dream of managing musicians since she had inherited her passion for music from her father. She was excited to explore the artistic city of Austin and her identity.

She decided to venture out on her own, starting school at Austin Community College (ACC). However, she quickly realized she had a lot of soul-searching to accomplish. She had never moved from Dallas and really wanted to immerse herself in a social lifestyle but had no real plans for her future.

Her time at ACC was spent realizing that she didn’t know which career path to choose, so she headed back home to Dallas to start over at Southern Methodist University (SMU). Her plans for attending UT had changed, yet she was thrilled to attend SMU and pursue music through her Arts Management minor.

“I didn’t know anyone at SMU really, so I thought I’d just buckle down and work,” Roberson said.

Roberson decided on a career in journalism, allowing her to meet Lisa Goodson, an administrator in the journalism school at SMU. Goodson introduced the idea of Roberson interning with Paper City Magazine.

Despite a windy path of not knowing what to do in life, Roberson finally discovered her passion for the magazine world working at Paper City until December of her junior year; but what would be her next step?

Her internship at Paper City led her to her next step at Forty Five Ten, a clothing boutique on McKinney Ave. that had been around for years. After being bought by Tim Headington, Forty Five Ten transformed into what it is today — a successful store on Main St. in downtown. Roberson was inspired by the store’s metamorphosis, so she decided on a whim to interview to be a marketing intern only three weeks after the store established its new home on Main St.

“I thought I had no chance,” she said. “[Forty Five Ten] was the new huge thing at that time. Everyone thought that store was so cool, but then I became the [store’s] only intern.”

She had the chance to work under Nick Wooster, the men’s fashion director from New York City, when he flew into town for photoshoots for the men’s department.

Instead of describing a glamorous encounter with Wooster, she told a story about the time Wooster gave her $100 to go buy him coffee at the first photoshoot.

“I went to buy his coffee with the money he gave me, but they wouldn’t accept the $100. They said the bill was too big. So, I paid for his coffee with my own money and ran back to the photoshoot to deliver it,” Roberson said. “I gave him his coffee and his money back and explained what happened. He looked surprised and told me to never spend my own money for work.”

She explained that Wooster then took her under his wing and became an important mentor. She said that their personalities “hit it off so well.” She explained how you don’t see a lot of genuineness and kindness in the fashion industry, which helped shape her work ethic.

Tracy Hayes, a friend of Roberson’s since 2017, was editorial director of Headington Companies and working at Forty Five Ten when she first met Roberson.

“She was one of those interns you dream about — smart, engaged, enthusiastic, quick to learn and not afraid to work! She also has great style, which is never a bad thing in this industry, and a seemingly innate ability to connect with people and build lasting relationships. The same qualities that make a good intern make a successful career. It’s truly been a joy to watch Rosie grow and bloom,” Hayes said.

Roberson said her time working at Forty Five Ten was the big start to her career. She learned that there are no small tasks and precision is key.

“[I learned] to be a hustler,” Roberson said. “Do things fast and right and always say yes you can do something. Hustle is so important to being successful.”

After working at Forty Five Ten, Roberson started a “super entry-level job” as the marketing and events coordinator at Modern Luxury, a luxury lifestyle publication. Due to what she had learn thus far and becoming close to the editor-in-chief, when the assistant editor left the magazine, Roberson was offered the job.

“Grit and luck got me where God wanted me to be. I got that [Forty Five Ten internship] because I was just confident and went with my gut and asked questions,” she said. “I didn’t even want to go into fashion at first. I wanted to be different than my mom because she’s a fashion designer and I grew up in the fashion world. But fashion is booming in Dallas and it comes naturally to me.”

Roberson has no real plans for the future.

“I kind of fell into the [fashion industry] completely and I’m taking life as it comes,” she said. “I want to see where my passion can take me.”